Thursday, February 13, 2020

First-Time Home Buyer Incentive






The First-Time Home Buyer Incentive helps people across Canada purchase their first home. The program offers 5 or 10% of the home’s purchase price to put toward a down payment. This addition to your down payment lowers your mortgage carrying costs, making home ownership more affordable.

Thursday, February 06, 2020

Why Canadians Really Need To Change Lenders At Mortgage Renewal Time, Especially Now


"A great number of people don't do any comparison shopping whatsoever and the banks take advantage of those people by offering higher rates at renewal."
Some advice on what to do if you can’t afford a mortgage rate hike. You're likelier to get a better mortgage rate if you switch lenders at renewal time.
 
How you can benefit from working with a Mortgage Broker - when renewal time comes around, we can help find you better rates in the marketplace and save you money. Read More...  #StratfordMortgageBroker

Canadians racked up $100 billion in credit card debt for first time ever and they're not done adding to it


Brace yourself for more debt and delinquencies next year — particularly in the Western provinces.
Canadians will likely see a slight increase in debt and delinquencies next year, particularly in Western provinces hit by downturns in the oil and farming industries, according to a new report by a consumer credit reporting agency.
The average Canadian’s non-mortgage debt may increase by 1 per cent to $31,531 by the end of 2020, New York Stock Exchange-listed TransUnion Co. forecast. Delinquency rates may fall to 5.41 per cent this year from 5.54 per cent at the end of September before increasing to 5.44 per cent by the end of next year, the data showed. Read entire article...

Does an increase in interest rates lead to more mortgage defaults in Canada?

The prevalent belief among policymakers — and basic economic theory — would seem to suggest that it should. But a recent study that took a look at data on consumer borrowing and spending in Canada is raising some questions about that relationship.
Fears that rising interest rates could make it harder for Canadian to make their mortgage payments was one of the motivations behind the tightening of mortgage regulations in Canada. The changes included, among others, the stress test, shortening of the amortization period and new taxes on foreign homebuyers. Policymakers in Canada were no doubt influenced by the experience in the United States, where a boom in subprime mortgages contributed significantly to the Great Recession in 2008. Read entire article...

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Can You Qualify For A Mortgage After A Consumer Proposal?

After you file a consumer proposal, the last thing on your mind might be a new mortgage, but you may be a lot closer than you think.

Maybe you wish to buy a home, or you own a home and are interested in refinancing your mortgage. Let’s first talk about purchasing a home.

When Can You Buy A Home After A Consumer Proposal? Read more...

Canadians’ New Year’s Resolution: Pay Down that Debt


It’s that time of year again, when we vow to kick bad habits and set a healthier or more positive course for the new year ahead. Improving our finances usually tops the list, and this year is no exception.

For the 10th straight year, the top financial priority for Canadians in 2020 is to pay off their debtsperhaps not surprising given that the average person dropped about $1,600 on holiday shopping last month. Read more...


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Thursday, November 17, 2016

New Mortgage Rules will affect first-time buyers



OTTAWA – Canada’s first-time home buyers may have to shelve their dream house fantasies due to lending changes announced this week by the federal government, mortgage brokers say.
Ottawa moved this week to tighten mortgage lending rules that will limit the amount many Canadians can borrow to help ensure that when interest rates rise, they’ll still be able to make their payments.
Mortgage broker Frank Napolitano says that means the size of mortgage many buyers will be able to qualify for will be less once the rules take effect on Oct. 17.
“First-time homebuyers will probably have to probably scale down the type of home that they may have planned to buy,” said Napolitano, managing partner at Mortgage Brokers Ottawa.

Under the new rules, a stress test that had only applied to borrowers who opted for variable rate mortgages or fixed rate mortgages with terms less than five years will now be used for all home buyers with less than a 20 per cent down payment.

That means borrowers must be able to qualify for their mortgage using a higher interest rate than they will actually be paying on their mortgage.
The advertised special offer rates for a five-year fixed rate mortgage at Canada’s big banks are around 2.5 per cent. However, the Bank of Canada-posted rate used in the stress test is 4.64 per cent based on the posted rate at the big banks.
“You’re not paying more, but you’re going to be able to buy less house,” Napolitano said.
wait.” New Mortgage Rules will affect first-time home buyers

First-time home buyers to get $4,000 land transfer rebate



Thursday, November 26, 2015

The perils of having no credit

I've seen it too many times.
Young people come into my office looking for a mortgage. Through hard work and discipline they have saved between $50,000 and $100,000 for a down payment and I cannot give them a mortgage.
Why? Because they have no credit score. It's not that they have poor credit, it's that they don't have any at all. They thought they were doing all the right things (and they were). They lived within their means, only bought items (even cars) when they had the money and don't owe anyone anything. But it's time to purchase their first home and the banks won't give them money.  Click here for entire article

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

Tax-Free Savings Account (TFSA)

The government brochure announcing the introduction of the TFSA calls it “the single most important personal savings vehicle since the introduction of the Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP)”. Unlike the usual hyperbole, the government is probably understating the importance that TFSAs are likely to play in the savings plans of all Canadians. Read more...